Benefits of Outdoor Play

In recent years, the digital age has caused kids to gravitate from the treehouse to the tablet – even in some child care facilities. While computers and technology have their place in children’s play and education, it shouldn’t replace the more fundamental components of it – such as getting outside and enjoying the fresh air.

Of course, many parents want to protect their children from the dangers of climbing trees and riding bicycles on concrete, but outdoor play can be more beneficial than it is dangerous. If you’re not yet convinced that getting back to basics with outdoor play is the best idea, here are a few of the many benefits.


It Allows Them to Get Creative

With most indoor play, children are bound by what specific activities require them to do. For example, puzzle pieces must go in one place, and children must play games on tablet devices in one set way to win. However, with outdoor play, there’s no “set” approach. The world is their oyster, giving them the opportunity to create their own fun and entertainment in the way they see fit. The big tree can become a pirate ship or a castle, and the grass can be hot lava or vast oceans. Creativity has no bounds when you’re outside playing – be it at home or in a child care facility.

It’s Good for Their Health

It’s never good for anyone to remain cooped up inside all day, and children are no exception. There are so many health benefits associated with outdoor play, which is why it’s such a significant part of child care routines. When children are outside, they are more likely to run around. Inside, running is often not allowed due to the many obstacles. Running around outside helps them to burn off energy, remain fit, and benefit from strong, healthy bones. What’s more, they are getting a healthy dose of Vitamin D. Just remember to slip, slop, slap, and wrap during those warmer months.

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What Oral Health Means for Overall Health

Contrary to popular belief, forgetting to go to the dentist, brush or floss regularly or take care of your teeth doesn’t just affect your mouth. While you do suffer from more decay and infections and a higher risk of gum disease, your entire body can also suffer.

New research is continually showing a strong connection between your oral health habits and your body’s overall health. If you see your dentist regularly and keep a consistent and regular brushing schedule, you may be able to prevent or reduce the risk of severe health issues such as strokes, heart attacks, and even premature labour if you’re pregnant. If you have diabetes, poor oral health can even spell complications. Believe it or not, a swab of your saliva can tell doctors and dentists a lot of about your overall health.

How Your Oral Health Affects Your Overall Health

Your mouth is a haven for bacteria. At any one time, around 500 species of bacteria call your mouth, teeth, and gums home. While your saliva plays a significant part in keeping your mouth healthy, it’s flossing and brushing that brings it home.

Without a brush or floss to remove food and keep your teeth clean, plaque begins to build up in your gumline. Eventually, it can create gingivitis which may then lead to a more severe condition known as periodontitis. If you have gum disease and then brush and floss, you’re at risk of allowing bacteria to enter your bloodstream. While your immune system is reasonably capable of combating nasty germs, there is a chance you can develop another infection in your body. If another disease or condition weakens your immune system, you are more at risk.

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What Causes Bad Breath?

Bad breath, or halitosis, can have you reaching for chewing gum on a regular basis – but you should really be visiting your dentist instead. If you suffer from bad breath to the point of not being comfortable in social situations, feeling anxious, and having a constant supply of mouthwash and chewing gum, it might be time to do some investigating.

While the cause of your bad breath could be entirely non-dental related, there’s every chance it could be as well. Therefore, there’s no time like the present to make an appointment to see your dentist today. In the meantime, we’ve covered some of the most common causes of bad breath below.

Poor Dental Hygiene

One of the most common causes of bad breath is a failure to take care of your oral health. If you don’t brush or floss your teeth daily as recommended by your dentist, you may find that you have bad breath more often than not. When you don’t brush your teeth, food particles become lodged in your teeth and a film of bacteria and plaque forms in your mouth. Over time, this plaque irritates your gums and can even lead to periodontitis.

Even if you have dentures, you’re still at risk of bad breath. If your dentures don’t fit properly or you don’t clean them regularly, they too can become laden with bacteria, with the result being bad breath.

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Benefits of Drug Recovery Programmes

While some people can quit drugs and alcohol cold turkey, many other people may benefit from in-patient and out-patient drug recovery programmes. If you’re struggling with drug addiction and aren’t sure whether drug rehab is for you, we’ve included just a few of the many benefits below. You may find that a drug recovery programme can help to turn your life around.

Continual Support

Rather than go cold turkey, with no support or help, a drug recovery programme enables you to benefit from professional assistance at any time of the day or night. A drug user’s low points don’t occur only during the day or weekdays. Therefore, having access to help during your darkest point – be it during the early hours of the morning or late at night – can make all the difference to your outcome.

Structure

If you tried and failed to quit drugs because the addiction was too strong, you may find drug rehab offers something your own willpower can’t: structure. In a drug rehabilitation facility, there are various programmes on offer every day to help provide both much-needed structure and distraction. The more time you spend doing something, the less time you have to figure out how to get your next hit, or to think about how badly you want drugs at that moment.

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